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välkommen to my house

We’re in Sweden now! We spent a few days exploring the Trondheim of many moons ago (back when it was the capital of Norway, and was called Nidaros), and then we cycled north along a gorgeous fjord until we turned east towards Sweden. Eli made the excellent pun “I can’t believe we’ve been affjorded all these terrific views!” Nyuk nyuk. It took another day, but we crossed the country line on a little dirt road without much fanfare (except on my part). I couldn’t even really tell where the border was apart from the signs. Having worked on the US-Canada border, where there is an engorged no man’s land so large that you couldn’t miss it even without eyesight, I thought that was pretty neat.

We meandered our way through very watery woods and peat bogs over the next day. Everywhere, water is close to the surface. Both small and large lakes abound, as well as tiny kettle ponds and rivers of all sizes. The mountains are surrounding us, with snow and freezing temps only a few hundred feet up. Down in the valleys it is pleasant, but still quite chilly at night depending on location.

This team of two decided it would be best if we try to take a rest day every four or five days, so that we don’t get burnt out or too fatigued. With all this mountain climbing and gravel riding we’ve been doing, that makes hella sense to me. And so after a few long (to me) days, we aimed for a random town to take a rest day in. A sign had let us know that the town should have food, lodging, and camping. We arrived after an 80 km day of riding, a third of which was dirt and most of which was a hill of varying size, to find out that the lodging and food signs had been scratched off the map and the camping hadn’t even existed in the first place. We made camp for the night in a little hideyhole, and found ourselves a campground down the road a short ways the next day, planning to take a day off.

Well! I found out that there was a bike park a few miles down the road from where we’d be staying, and there was suddenly all this fantastic literature all around me (okay, yes, we were in a library, so, not surprising, no) promoting biking in the region and at the bike park. It had been my intention when planning this trip that while we would ride our touring bikes from country to country, that if we made it to various bikes parks across Europe, that Eli should have the opportunity to ride at them if he wanted to. He had already passed by Hafjell in Norway on their opening weekend, without much fanfare other than taking a pic of the slopes. So I worked on him a bit and tried to get him to tell me if he wanted to go downhilling. One might say it’s a bit like cracking open an oyster, it’s a bit of going back and forth. I knew he wanted to. We both knew he wanted to. And then we saw some big bikes at the campground we were staying at. Our plan was get up early the next morning, see if they were headed back to the Åre Bike Park, and if so, ask for a ride. And it worked! Thanks to John and his son Emil for letting us tag along in their camper, for riding up to the very top of the mountain in a cable car with us, so that we could descend a 5.5 mile trail in heavy wind and rain, and for a tasty post-ride beer. And for refusing any sort of recompense afterwards! There are so many lovely people in this world.

Now! Here are a few photos from our time in Trondheim. More recent photos will have to wait.


The Nidaros cathedral was impressive. The most northerly Gothic cathedral in the world! We sat outside of it one day, and even had the place to ourselves for a few quiet minutes in the evening. The next day we went inside, and found sooo many triangles and Illuminati paraphernalia. Shhh.


We went to Baklandet Skydsstation for their midday herring buffet. All the herring you can dream of, in every sort of sauce, plus a beer and an Aquavit. The Aquavit selection was longer than our 80 km day of biking the other day, so we had the waitress pick us out two options. We came for the herring, we stayed for the beautiful Norwegian tapestry hangings. And then I had a belly ache, because I ate way too much.


Eli demonstrates, sans bicycle, how to use the bicycle lift.


We had plenty of time, so we went to a number of museums. We saw 1) creepy dioramas detailing the history of skiing in Norway, 2) lots of really old swords + shit, and 3) the ruins of a castle built on top of a hill over one thousand years ago. I have a thing for dioramas.


It was Midsummer, and while we sadly couldn’t find any wild parties to join in on like we’d heard tell of, we did make ourselves a tasty supper, and threaten each other with another pound or three of pickled herring. 

More next time!

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12 thoughts on “välkommen to my house

  1. There ARE nice people in the world, so good to be reminded of that from time to time. Europe and European architecture are stunningly beautiful, I’m feeling travel-sick and itching to get back, your photos are so gorgeous.

    1. There certainly are, sometimes you need to search them out, and sometimes you get lucky and they find you!

      Let me help you scratch that itch! Come traveling!

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